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OIL AND GAS STATISTICS

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    CNH participates in 18 collaboration agreements with universities and research centers

    Published on November 06, 2018
    To date, the National Hydrocarbons Commission (“CNH”, for its initials in Spanish) has signed 18 collaboration agreements with 14 universities and 4 research centers. It is in the process of signing 9 more agreements.

    These agreements establish mechanisms to access information held in the CNH’s National Hydrocarbons Information Center, and are key to the future of Mexican human capital in engineering, as well as to the development of science and technology in the national oil sector.

    In addition, the collaboration agreements encourage transparency and accountability in the sector.

    16 agreements have been signed with national institutions: 4 in Tabasco, 3 in Veracruz, 3 in Mexico City, 1 in Baja California, 1 in Coahuila, 1 in the State of Mexico, 1 in Nuevo Leon, 1 in Oaxaca and 1 in Puebla. The CNH has signed two international agreements, both with the University of Austin in Texas, U.S.A.


    Fuentes: Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission
    https://www.gob.mx/cnh/documentos/convenios-cnih
    https://portal.cnih.cnh.gob.mx/downloads/es_MX/normatividad/Lineamientos%20para%20el%20uso%20de%20inforamci%C3%B3n%20del%20CNIH.pdf

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    Production Projections for the Tampico-Misantla Basin

    Published October 11, 2018
    Tampico-Misantla is Mexico’s largest basin in terms of prospective resources, and holds 21% of the nation’s 2P reserves of crude oil equivalent as of 2018. In 2032, its estimated production potential could range between 666 and 929 MB/D of oil, and between 1,359 and 2,093 MMCF/D of natural gas.

    The volume of potential production was estimated taking into consideration entitlements (license areas) as well as existing and future contractual areas.

    Prospective production takes into account conventional and unconventional prospective resources in the areas included in the 5-Year Plan, asumming yearly tenders of a total of 30 blocks with a 60% award rate, in addition to 6 E&P projects undertaken by Petroleos Mexicanos.2

    In the case of tenders of conventional areas, expected production curves are estimated according to the identified exploratory opportunities. In the case of unconventionals, 20% recovery of prospective resources identified in the area is assumed, and using international analogues.


    KBD: Thousands of barrels per day, MMCFD: millions of cubic feet per day.

    To estimate the production potential of the basin, it is assumed that all future contracts with unconventional activities begin to produce in year 4 after having been awarded. In base scenarios, recovery of up to 40% of the P50 of prospective block of resources is considered, while the high estimate assumes recovery of up to 40% of the P10 of prospective resources block in each successful exploratory attempt.

    1/ Considering the observed average production from January to August 2018.

    2 / For blocks awarded in conventional onshore areas, three exploratory attempts are assumed, while for unconventional onshore areas and shallow waters, two exploratory attempts per opportunity are assumed. Only those blocks whose net present value is positive after expenses are considered.

    Source: National Hydrocarbons Comission.

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    Geological description of the Tampico-Misantla Basin

    Published September 24, 2018
    Tampico-Misantla Basin oil history shows that it is a basin with large deposits of oil and gas. The following are the conventional plays:

    • Oil and gas accumulations in sandstones in the Huehuetepec Formation during the Middle Jurassic (J Med), in the western portion of the basin and the Buried Tectonic Front in the Eastern Sierra Madre.
    • Fields producing oil and gas in extensive bars of Oolitic limestone and transgressive calcareous sands in the San Andrés Formation during the Upper Jurassic Kimmeridgian (J Sup).
    • Fractured clayey limestone in the Lower and Middle Cretaceous (K Inf - K Med, Lower and Upper Tamaulipas Formation) with oil opportunities in the Area Paleocañón – Bejuco – La Laja.
    • Large carbonate platforms during the Middle Cretaceous (K Med) with developments in lagoon facies, reef and batter breaches constituting the “Faja de Oro” (Gold Belt). In the latter, spectacular discoveries have been made since 1920, when a production of 500 million barrels of oil per day was achieved.
    • Accumulating sands of hydrocarbons from Chicontepec, considered the most important oil reserve of the Mexican basin. Chicontepec represent a considerable technological challenge to achieve profitable exploitation. Currently, new strategies such as the horizontal drilling are being analyzed.

    Regarding the basin’s non-conventional plays:

    • Deposits of oil and gas in shales during the Upper Tithonian Jurassic (J Sup) and the Upper Cretaceous Turonian (K Sup), abundant organic matter and rocks of low permeability acting simultaneously as generating, reservoir, trap and seal rocks.
    • Calcareous shales in the Oxfordian Upper Jurassic (J Sup) with oil and gas potential, which can be evaluated by studies and exploration wells to prove productivity.

    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    Oil Potential in the Tampico-Misantla Basin

    Published September 7, 2018
    Exploration in the Tampico-Misantla Basin began in the 1860’s, and production in 1904. To date, the basin has produced 5.869 billion barrels of oil and 8,447 billion cubic feet of gas. 10,470 wells have been drilled in the basin, among these, 265 offshore.

    Tampico-Misantla ranks number one in prospective resources in the country, with an estimated 37 billion barrels of crude oil equivalent. 86% of these resources are thought to be oil and 14% gas.

    In terms of discovered resources, Tampico-Misantla holds 21% of crude oil equivalent reserves 2P in 2018, of which 67% is oil and 37% is gas.


    BBOE: billion barrels of oil equivalent. Prospective resources are those quantities of petroleum estimated, as of a given date, to be potentially recoverable from undiscovered accumulations by application of future development projects.
    Sources:

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    Oil activity improves during first semester of 2018

    Published August 21, 2018
    In the first half of 2018, the following Oil Activity Indicators were observed:

    • 38 drilling rigs were operating (annual var. of 46%).1

    • 87 wells were drilled, among these, 91% were being used for development activities. This is more than double last year’s figure for the first semester.


    Source: CNH. Hydrocarbons Information System (SIH), available at: https://portal.cnih.cnh.gob.mx/dashboard-sih.php
    1 / Figures correspond to the drilling rigs in use during the semester, on average.

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    Mandatory storage obligations for natural gas in European Union (EU)

    Published August 15, 2018
    Through an analysis of storage obligations related to the security of natural gas supply in 11 countries of the European Union, it was found that:

    8 of these countries have storage obligations of natural gas, except for Germany, Austria and the United Kingdom.

    In terms of the storage obligations (calculated as equivalent days of national consumption), 3 categories of countries can be defined:

    • Countries with less than 20 days’ storage capacity: Denmark, Czech Republic, Spain and Poland.

    • Countries with between 20 and 40 days’ capacity: Italy and Bulgaria.

    • Countries with more than 40 days’ capacity: Hungary and France.

    The total amount of mandatory storage is computed differently in each country and, more specifically, is determined with reference to: projected winter demand, import quantity in a given period, past firm sales in a given period, total consumption and supply standards.

    Although in Germany, Austria and the United Kingdom the storage of natural gas is not mandatory, these 3 countries have storage equivalent to 95 days, 266 days and 19 days of national consumption, respectively.

    Source: Study "The role of gas storage in internal market and in ensuring security of supply", available at: https://ec.europa.eu/energy/sites/ener/files/documents/REPORT-Gas%20Storage-20150728.pdf European Union. Regulation (EU) No 994/2010, available at: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2010:295:0001:0022:EN:PDF

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    Access and use of information from the National Hydrocarbons Information Center (CNIH)

    Published August 02, 2018
    The National Hydrocarbons Commission, through the National Hydrocarbons Information Center (CNIH) collects, preserves, manages, analyzes, uses and updates the information belonging to the Nation, obtained from Recognition and Surface Exploration activities (G&G permits), as well as from hydrocarbons Exploration and Extraction activities.11

    Currently, CNIH’s users can:
    • View the technical information in physical data rooms. To date, 1,562 visits sessions have been made.

    • Request access to the information through licenses of use.2 To date, 176 companies have requested access, and in total 144 licenses of use have been granted, 329 requests for information (supplements) approved and 282 bid data packets accessed.3.

    • Visits to the Nationapository for information of physical samples. To date, 212 visits have been made and 5,147 specialized services attended.

    Visit the CNIH’s portal of technical information at: https://portal.cnih.cnh.gob.mx/ and stay informed.


    1 Article 32 of the Hydrocarbons Law
    2 Guidelines for the use of information stored in the National Hydrocarbon Information Center, available at:
    https://portal.cnih.cnh.gob.mx/downloads/en_US/normatividad/Lineamientos%20para%20el%20uso%20de%20inforamci%C3%B3n%20del%20CNIH.pdf
    3 During bids rounds 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3, there was no license of use scheme.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    The CNH sets new international standard in transparency

    Published July 20, 2018
    Mexico is ranked first in transparency of tender processes and contract management in the extractive sector, according to the report ”Open Contracting for Oil, Gas and Mineral Rights: Shining a Light on Good Practices", published this June by the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI) and the Open Contracting Partnership (OCP).1

    14 countries and 16 best international practices in different areas were considered in the evaluation. Mexico’s CNH excelled in 7 practices, positioning itself as a leading institution in transparency.

    In the report, Mexico excels in the following categories: 1) Explaining the system of the tender process; 2) Transparency of decision-makers; 3) Clear, effective and timely communication regarding the areas to be allocated; 4) Public servant conflict of interest statements; 5) Publishing contract awards and outcomes of allocation; 6) Publishing contracts with annexes and disclosures, and 7) Follow-up and compliance with contract terms and fulfillment.

    The CNH has created a plan for proactive transparency, in which it has been able to advance thanks to a permanent and open dialogue with civil society organizations.


    1 The full report is available via this link: https://resourcegovernance.org/analysis-tools/publications/open-contracting-oil-gas-and-mineral-rights

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    Favorable terms for the Mexican State in offshore exploration and extraction contracts

    Published July 12, 2018
    In terms of profit-sharing, economic terms for the Mexican State in offshore oil contracts are more favorable than those in the United States and Brazil.1

    In shared production contracts (32), government take was 75% and in license contracts (27), it was 63%.2

    The percentage of government take in Mexican license contracts is more than that of concessions in Brazil and license contracts in the United States, where the Mexican State receives 59% and 55% of profits, respectively.3

    As of March 2018, income received by the Mexican State from oil contracts totals $304.9 million dollars.4

    Sources:
    1 In total, 107 exploration and extraction contracts have been signed in Mexico. National Hydrocarbons Comission, Mexican Rounds, relevant data available at: https://rondasmexico.gob.mx/cnh-cifra-inicio/
    2 Mexico: average government take reported by the Secretaría de Hacienda y Crédito Público (Secretary of Finance) for offshore contracts awarded.
    3 Brazil: corresponds to the terms of the concessions in Brazil in the last round (round 15) and the seven shared production contracts awarded to date. Based on estimates by the CNH, considering a project type for deep water and another for shallow waters. Indirect taxes for import and export are not considered. More information at: http://rodadas.anp.gov.br/pt/
    United States: Estimated from the "Outer Continental Shelf" (OCS) in the Gulf of Mexico. Original Government Analysis by Daniel Johnston Co, available at: http://www.danieljohnston.com/database.php
    4 See note 1.

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    The volume of hydrocarbons discovered in 2017 is the highest in the last 5 years

    Published June 27, 2018
    Since 2013, 49 fields have been discovered, incorporating reserves for a total of 917 MMBBL of oil and 2,041 BCF of gas.1

    In 2017, PEMEX announced the discovery of the field Ixachi, incorporating reserves of 65.6 MMBBL of oil and 761.8 BCF of gas. This represented 37% of the total volume of gas discovered between 2013 and 2017.2

    In 2023, Ixachi will reach its peak of production, with 22 KBPD of oil and 233 MMCFD of gas.3

    MMBBL: millions of barrels, BCF: billion cubic feet, MMBOE: million barrels of oil equivalent, KBD: thousand barrels per day, MMCFD: million cubic feet per day.
    Sources:
    1 National Hydrocarbons Commission (CNH). Discoveries and discovery rate during 2013 to 2017, with the General Direction of Reserves Information.
    Note: In 2017, a discovery by Talos (Zama) was announced. However, reserves associated with this discovery are not yet incorporated into calculations.
    2 Ibídem. Considering the total volume of 2P reserves.
    3 National Hydrocarbons Commission (CNH). Indicators profiles 1P, 2P and 3P, with information from the General Direction of Reserves. Profile 2P considered as peak production.

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    Favorable International Environment for Opportunities in Mexican Heavy Crude Oil Production

    Published June 21, 2018
    • 2P reserves of crude oil in Mexico reached 12,089 MMB. Of these, 1,421 MMB correspond to fields without production, whose estimated production is a total of 330 KBPD.1

    • In comparison, Venezuela has decreased its production to approximately 700 KBPD (33%) after the termination of the supply agreement with OPEC in 2016. It is estimated that production will continue to decline by an additional 300 KBPD in 2018.2

    • Meanwhile, Canada faces difficulties selling its crude, due to capacity restrictions of crude oil transport pipelines from Alberta to the US Gulf Coast3, as well as delays in the construction of the Transmountain pipeline which will transport crude to Asia.4 In this context, the price of oil has suffered severe discounts (WTC and WCS price gap at US$ - 17.40/b).5

    • The current international environment presents an excellent opportunity for the development of heavy oil in Mexico.


    KBPD: thousands of barrels per day, mmb: million barrels
    Sources:
    1 National Hydrocarbons Commission (CNH). Evaluation of reserves through 01 January 2018. Fields can contain different types of hydrocarbon, the production estimate takes into account 2P production. For Esah and Teekit Deepwater, potential production considered the ratio of heavy oil to total oil. There are 22 fields of heavy production and 80 of production with crude. The daily production estimate considers total maximum attainable.
    2 Jacobs, j. (2018). Venezuela: Opec’s heavy lifter. Petroleum Economist. May 2018, 12-13. OPEC Market indicators as of the end of May 2018.
    3 Polczer, S. (2018). Alberta’s differential dilemma. Petroleum Economist. May 2018, 35.
    4 Polczer, S. (2018). New markets for Canada´s oil remain elusive. Petroleum Economist, June 2018, 44.
    5 National Hydrocarbons Commission (CNH). For more information, please see National Hydrocarbons System. Ministry of the Popular Power of Venezuela, Economic Dashboard Alberta Government.

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    CNH has approved more than $12 billion dollars of investment in exploration and development contracts

    Published June 13, 2018
    Investment approved by the CNH in plans for exploration and development contracts:
    • The total amount of investment approved so far is US$12.047 billion.

    • For every US$10 of approved investment, $8.40 is in shallow waters (US$10.064 billion), $1.20 in deep waters (US$1.467 billion), and $0.40 in onshore projects (US$517 million).

    • Considering investment by basin, 86.4% of approved investment is in the Southeast Basin, while deep Gulf projects receive 12.2% of investment.

    • More than 90% of approved investments are concentrated in contracts located in Campeche, Tabasco and Tamaulipas.


    Source:
    National Hydrocarbons Commission (CNH). For more information, please see National Hydrocarbons System available at the CNH’s Statistics portal.
    Note: The figures correspond to the estimated investment in exploration and development plans delivered by the contractors, approved by the CNH and corresponding to the terms of each contract.

     

  • Distribución de reservas recuperables en campos terrestres (MMbpce)

    Oil Industry Activity in Mexico Intensifies

    Published June 7, 2018
    Oil Activity Indicators January - April 2018:
    • There were 37 drilling rigs operating, which represents an increase of 54.1% compared to the same period in 2017. Among these rigs, 24 were being used for development activities and 13 for exploration1.

    • Regarding location, 17 rigs were onshore and 20 offshore. The onshore drilling equipment being used is 3.4 times greater than the active equipment observed from January to April 2017.

    • 62 wells were drilled, a figure which represents more than double of what was observed in the first quarter of 2017, when 24 wells were drilled. Drilled wells are mostly onshore developments (53), of which 36 were in Tampico Misantla2.


    Source:
    National Hydrocarbons Comission (CNH). For more information, please see National Hydrocarbons System and the drilling equipment and wells report , available at the CNH’s Statistics portal.
    1 Figures correspond to the drilling equipment used in the quarter, on average.
    2Distribution by basin is available in the drilling equipment and wells report.
    The figures may not match due to rounding.

     

  • Distribution of Recoverable Reserves of Onshore Fields (MMBOE)

    Onshore Fields in Mexico Larger Than Those in Colombia and Brazil

    Published May 22, 2018
    • Discovered onshore fields in Mexico are, on average, 3 times larger than fields in Colombia and 4 times larger than those in Brazil.

    • Onshore discoveries in Mexico average 59 MMBOE, while in Colombia they average 23 MMBOE and in Brazil 16 MMBOE.

    • The median (P50) of onshore fields in Mexico is 22% greater than that of Colombia and 92% greater than the median in Brazil.

    • Of the Mexican onshore fields, the largest include: Samaria (2,214 MMBOE), Poza Rica (1,871 MMBOE) and Jujo-Tecominoacán (1,702 MMBOE), which present recoverable reserves greater than the largest onshore fields in Colombia (Cano Limón: 1,341 MMBOE) and Brazil (Carmópolis: 443 MMBOE).


    MMBOE: Million barrels of oil equivalent

    Sources:
    • For Mexico, National Hydrocarbons Commission (CNH). For more information, please see Hydrocarbons Information System and the Hydrocarbon Reserves Interactive Dashboard, available at the CNH’s Statistics Portal.
    • For Colombia and Brazil, Upstream Data Tool by Wood Mackenzie (WM). WM takes into account recoverable reserves at the year of discovery of onshore fields. Recoverable reserves calculations include reserves of oil, gas, condensates and LNG.

     

  • Mejora entorno internacional para crudos pesados
    Mejora entorno internacional para crudos pesados

    Offshore Wells in Southeast Basin Most Productive in Mexico

    Published May 14, 2018
    Offshore oil wells located in the Southeast Basin are the most productive in Mexico. During the first five years of well life, these wells reach a cumulative production of 13.1 million barrels of oil on average. After 25 years of well life, they reach cumulative production levels of 28.2 million barrels.

    Offshore wells in the Tampico-Misantla Basin present production of 3.1 million barrels at 25 years, greater than onshore wells in the Southeast Basin.

    Regarding non-associated gas production, wells located in the Veracruz and Sabinas basins perform best, with cumulative production of 5 billion cubic feet at five years of well life.

    Note:
    Includes wells with more than two years of production, and those where production ended in the first quarter of 2018.
    Source:
    National Hydrocarbons Commission, for more information please see “Hydrocarbons information system”.

     

  • Mejora entorno internacional para crudos pesados
    Mejora entorno internacional para crudos pesados

    2017 Income to the State Increases Due to Contracts

    Published May 2, 2018
    • The State received income from Hydrocarbons Exploration and Production Contracts in the amount of $339 million dollars during 2017, 18 times the amount received in 2016 ($19 million dollars).

    • $180 million dollars of this income was generated by signing bonuses from tender rounds, $108 million from the sale of hydrocarbons belonging to the State, $36 million from royalties, and $15 million from contract fees.

    • Income in January 2018 reached $24.09 million dollars, an amount 10 times the income received in January 2017 ($2.52 million dollars).


    Source:
    National Hydrocarbons Commission, with information from the Mexican Oil Fund for Stabilization and Development. For further information, please see “Hydrocarbons Payments”, as well as “Oil Companies in Mexico Interactive Dashboard” available at the Commission’s Statistics portal.

     

  • Mejora entorno internacional para crudos pesados
    Mejora entorno internacional para crudos pesados

    84% of 1P oil reserves in Mexico are in Southeast Basin

    Published April 19, 2018
    Proven reserves (1P) in Mexico reached 6,464.2 MMB of oil and 10,022.4 BCF of gas in 2018.
    In addition, the ratio of the amount of proven reserves (1P) to national production increased in 2018 from 2017:
    • In the case of oil, the ratio increased from 8.9 to 9.1 years.

    • In the case of gas, it increased from 4.9 to 5.4 years.

    The new estimate of 1P reserves in areas tendered in the Second Tender of Round 1 (R1T2) contributed to the tripling of the volume of reserves in said areas, from 83.4 to 251.1 MMBOE.
    Discoveries in the Veracruz and Southeast Basins contributed in the order of 153.8 MMBOE.

    Sources:
    National Hydrocarbons Commission (2018). Reserves by field, available at: https://portal.cnih.cnh.gob.mx/estadisticas.php
    National Hydrocarbons Commission (2018). 1P reserves through January 1, 2018, available at: https://www.gob.mx/cms/uploads/attachment/file/311232/Presentacion._Reservas_1P_al_1-ene-2018_ODG_V3.2_dgr_vf.pdf
    MMB: million barrels
    BCF: billion cubic feet
    MMBOE : million barrels of oil equivalent

     

  • Mejora entorno internacional para crudos pesados

    Comparison of international oil rounds

    Published April 12, 2018
    • In Bidding Round 3.1 for shallow waters areas in Mexico, 45.7% of the offered contracts were awarded, similar figure to Brazil, where 46.8% were awarded and with a very outstanding results compared to United States, that placed 1% of the contracts.

    • The tender in Mexico was crowded, with the participation of 18 companies from 12 countries, of which 14 were winners.

    • Participation in Round 3.1 was highly competitive. On average, 2.3 offers were received per contract, a figure higher than that of the most recent tenders in Brazil and the United States, in which 1.5 and 1.1 offers were received per contract, respectively.

    • In Round 3.1, 42.3% of the total area were awarded, while in Brazil was 48.4% and in the United States 0.1%.

    Sources:
    National Hydrocarbons Commission’s (2018). Results of the opening ceremony and presentation of proposals, and “Table of oil companies in Mexico.”.
    ANP (2018). 15th Bidding Round, available at: http://rodadas.anp.gov.br/en/15th-bidding-round
    BOEM (2018). Sale Day Statistics, available at: https://www.boem.gov/Sale-250/.

     

  • Mejora entorno internacional para crudos pesados

    PEMEX is company with most contract awards in Mexican bidding rounds

    Published April 3, 2018
    • Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) has won 14 Exploration and Hydrocarbons Production Contracts during the 9 Mexican oil and gas tender processes1, making it the company to which the most contracts have been awarded thus far.

    • For these 14 contracts, PEMEX bid as an individual company for 3 contracts and in consortium for 11, making alliances with 7 international companies from 7 different countries. PEMEX has agreed in these contracts to drill 8 exploratory wells.

    • The Mexican company Jaguar and Dutch company Shell2 are in second place, each with 11 awarded contracts. Jaguar won 5 contracts individually and 7 in consortium. Shell was awarded 4 contracts individually and 7 in consortium.

    • Jaguar is the company with the largest number of promised wells, for a total of 20 onshore wells. In second place is Shell with 13 deepwater wells.

    • Through the conclusion of the first tender of Round 3, 107 contracts have been tendered, covering an area of approximately 88,650 km2.

    1 In reference to State areas of Rounds 1, 2 and 3. In total, the National Hydrocarbons Commission has held 13 tender processes: 4 in Round 1, in Round 2, 1 in Round 3 and 4 in Strategic Partners for PEMEX (not considering the Nobilis-Maximino tender which was cancelled).
    2 According to the company website, Shell is originally a Dutch company, although it is also registered in the United Kingdom.

    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, “Results of the Presentation and Opening of Bids Act”. For more information, please see “Table of oil and gas companies in Mexico”.

     

  • Mejora entorno internacional para crudos pesados

    21 companies organized into 36 bidders will participate in Round 3.1

    Published on march 23th, 2018
    • For the First Tender of Round 3, during which 35 production shared contracts in shallow waters will be tendered, 21 companies were registered as 36 bidders: 14 individual companies and 22 in consortium.

    • The company Deutsche Erdoel Mexico (DEA) will participate as 9 bidders, making it the company with the most associations in this tender. In second place appears Pemex, being able to participate individually and through 6 consortiums.

    • It also highlights that 9 of the 21 companies (see chart on the left) may participate as bidders in more than three different ways, and only 3 of the 21 (Chevron, ONGC Videsh and Repsol) will participate exclusively as individual companies.

    • It is important to note that 17 of the 21 registered companies have won contracts in previous bidding rounds (in Mexico). This is the first time Malaysian company Sapura Exploration and Production participates in a bidding process in the country.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, List of participating companies. For more information please see “List of oil companies in Mexico"

     

  • Mejora entorno internacional para crudos pesados

    Heavy Crude Field Potential

    Published March 13, 2018
    • The Southeast Basin contains 22 discovered heavy crude fields that have yet to be developed.

    • Of these, 14 are State Fields that have yet to be tendered. The most important are: Pit, Kayab, Kastelán, Alak and Kach1.

    • 2P reserves in these 14 fields are estimated to be 796 million barrels of crude 10° API, on average; taken together, production is estimated to reach 186,000 barrels per day in 5 years2.

    • On the other hand, 8 heavy crude fields of Pemex3 were identified currently not in production, including: Ayín4, Batsil, Utsil and Tekel.

    • 2P reserves in these 8 fields are estimated to be 627 million barrels of heavy crude 14° API on average; taken together, production is estimated to reach 145,000 barrels per day in 5 years5.
    Notes:
    1 Fields included: Alak, Baksha, Chapabil, Kach, Kastelán, Kayab, Mene, Nab, Numan, Pit, Pohp, Toloc, Tson, and Zazil-Ha. Of these, only 10 fields have 2P oil reserves, while the remaining 4 have 3P reserves.
    2 Production calculated in a 2P crude scenario, through January 1, 2017. The estimate is calculated based on maximum attainable production in a five-year period from start of production in each field.
    3 Ayín, Batsil, Esah, Makech, Tekel, Tlacame, Uchbal and Utsil. Esah Field has an additional light crude reservoir with 2P reserves of 43 million barrels.
    4 The Ayin field crude has a gravity of 24 ° API
    5 (See Note 2).
    MMB: million barrels; MB/d: thousand barrels per day

    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, for more information please see “Hydrocarbon Reserves Dashboard”, “Oil and Gas Production Dashboard”, and “Hydrocarbons Information System (HIS)”, as well as reserves and production reports available at Statistics .

     

  • International outlook improves for heavy crudes

    International outlook improves for heavy crudes

    Published March 5, 2018

    Over the last five years, Western Canadian Select (WCS) heavy crude has gained $14 dollars on West Texas Intermediate (WTI).

    This decrease in price spread can be explained by increased demand for heavy crude from US Gulf refineries, as well as the decline in exports from Latin America.

    To increase the supply of heavy crude to these refineries, the construction and extention of pipelines from Canada has been proposed, but it is likely these projects will take years to complete.1

    At a global level, there is growing demand for heavy crude, especially from China and India. This presents an opportunity for these types of crude in Mexico, especially from already discovered offshore fields.


    Notes:
    1This has resulted in the increase of Canadian exports of crude via train from 9,400 barrels per day in January 2012 to 152,000 barrels per day in December 2017, according to the National Energy Board of Canada.

     

  • In three years, Mexico triples its 2D-seismic information of the Gulf of Mexico

    In three years, Mexico triples its 2D-seismic information of the Gulf of Mexico

    Published on February 26, 2018
    • Since 2015, 332,050 kilometers of information have been acquired using the seismic 2D method, via 10 authorized Reconnaissance and Surface Exploration Activities (“ARES”, for its initials in Spanish). Newly acquired lengths from these studies tripled the 2D-seismic data available in the Document Archives.

    • Additionally, two 3D studies using Wide-Azimuth technology (WAZ) have been authorized to acquire 87,096 km2 of additional data. With this information, we quadrupled the 3D-seismic with WAZ technology data available in the Document Archives.2

    • So far, there have been 39 ARES authorized, of which 18 involve data acquisition and 21 involve data reprocessing.3
    Sources:
    1Taking into account the Ayatsil Pit, Centauro, Centauro Sur and Yaxiltun Oriente studies.
    2CNH (2018). CNH (2018). Seismic 3D Inventory and Seismic 2D Inventory, available at: Digital Information
    3CNH (2018). CNH (2018). “Reporte de Autorizaciones de Reconocimiento y Exploración Superficial”, available at: ARES Report
    Note:
    Wide Azimuth (WAZ) technology refers to a seismic data acquisition technique where separate source vessels are used to record seismic reflections from areas to the side of the recording spread.

     

  • Mexican offshore exploration hits a record

    Mexican offshore exploration hits a record

    Published on February 15th 2018
    • In the period 2018-2021, 24 offshore exploratory wells will be drilled each year, according to the committed investment programs.

    • This level of offshore exploration represents a record high over the last 30 years, and 44% of activities will be by new operators.

    • Between 2018-2021, 43 wells are scheduled to be drilled by the new operators: on average, 11 wells per year (3 shallow water and 8 deepwater per year).
    Note:
    1The number of exploratory wells from contracts for 2018-2021 corresponds to projections presented by new operators in the Exploration, Evaluation or Development Plans (as appropriate). For contracts that don’t yet have approved plans, the estimate is based on the number of wells committed during the bidding process.
    2Exploratory wells expected for PEMEX’s entitlements were estimated considering the drilling rate of the last 7 years (2011-2017).

    Source:
    National Hydrocarbons Commission, see more at Drilling equipment and wells report and the summary reports for each bidding process, available at the Biddings and Contracts section on the Statistics webpage.

     

  • Mexico keeps attracting investment in deep water regions

    Mexico keeps attracting investments in deep water regions

    Published on February 6th 2018
    • Acreage associated to offered contracts in Mexico’s Round 2.4 was 66,425 km2; this is 78% lower than in the US and 46% lower than in Brazil.
    • However, the total area in awarded contracts in Mexico’s last round was 44,178 km2, which is twice the area awarded in Brazil and 21 times more the area in the US.
    • Likewise, Round 2.4 in Mexican deep water regions received, on average, more offers by area (2.1), which is higher than the average in Brazil’s (1.3) and the US’ last rounds (1.1).1
    • Finally, Government Take in Mexico is estimated at 64.7%2, higher than historical average in deepwater in the US, calculated at 55%.3
    Fuente:
    1/ BOEM (2017). Sale Day Statistics, available at: https://www.boem.gov/Sale-249-Stats
    ANP (2017). Consolidated results per block, available at: http://www.brasil-rounds-data.anp.gov.br/relatoriosbid/Bloco/ConsolidadoBlocoDesktop/27
    2/ SHCP (2018). Statement on the results of the Fourth Call of Round Two, available at: https://www.gob.mx/shcp/prensa/comunicado-145587
    3/ Original Government Take chart by Daniel Johnston Co.
  • Pemex registers for R2.4 through 6 consortiums and individually

    Pemex registers for R2.4 through 6 consortiums and individually

    Published on January 26th 2018
    • For the last tender of Round 2, corresponding to deep water contracts, Pemex may participate through 7 bidders, placing itself as the company with the largest number of associations in this tender.
    • In total 21 companies were registered through 26 bidders: 9 individual and 17 in consortium.
    • Stresses that 9 companies may participate through at least three bidders, either individually or in consortium. While only BHP Billiton and ExxonMobil will participate only individually.
    • 13 companies registered for this tender, also participated in the fourth tender for round 1 in deep water. In that tender, Total was the company with the highest allocation, winning 3 contracts, one in association with ExxonMobil and two in association with Statoil and BP, with which it returns to participate in R2.4.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, for more information go to “Oil companies in Mexico dashboard”
  • High productivity in Veracruz Basin’s wells Fuente:
    1 CNH (2018). Production by well database. Only wells with more than 24 monthly periods and no production since December 2015 were considered.
    2Wood MacKenzie (2018). Eagle Ford Type Curve Review June 2017, available at: Wood Mackenzie
    Mmcf: million cubic feet

    High productivity in Veracruz Basin’s wells

    Published on January 23th 2018
    • Average accumulated production per well in Veracruz Basin in its first 5 years is estimated at 4,921 mmcf. This production is higher than average accumulated production per well in the same period in these regions:
      • Burgos, whose average accumulated production per well is calculated at 1,404 mmcf;
      • Eagle Ford Southeast unconventional play, with an average accumulated production 1,788 mmcf per well;
      • Eagle Ford Southwest unconventional play, with 3,628 mmcf per well, on average;
    • This means that an average well in Veracruz exceeds by 250% a Burgos’ average well performance, by 175% an Eagle Ford Southeast’s well, and by 36% an Eagle Ford Southwest’s well in the first five years of production.
    • Standard well in Veracruz Basin has an average accumulated production over its lifetime of 6,639 mmcf, which is 135% higher than mean accumulated production in Burgos’ typical well, calculated at 2,814 mmcf1, and 117% higher than average accumulated production per well in Eagle Ford Southeast, calculated at 3,049 mmcf.2
    • Average accumulated production per well in Eagle Ford Southwest unconventional play is 25% higher than average Veracruz’s well accumulated production.
    • Veracruz Basin covers an extension of 34,825 km2. Main Plays in this basin are from Miocene age, with wet gas and dry gas as principal hydrocarbons. Historically, 571 producers wells have been drilled but only 226 wells were considered in this analysis.
  • More than 60,000 million dollars are expected in investments in contracts

    More than 60,000 million dollars are expected in investments in contracts

    Published on December 28th 2017
    • Investments in contracts from Round 1 and 2, and farmouts are estimated at $61,012 mmUSD for the next 25 years.1
    • So far, 72 contractual areas have been assigned. 38 contractual areas were assigned in Round 1, 31 areas in Round 2 –with one pending bid-, and 3 areas were assigned in Farmouts.
    • All 9 deep water contract investments represent 71% of the total expected investment. Investments in the 15 contracts with areas located in shallow waters make 24% while investments in the 48 onshore contracts is equal to 5% of the total expected investment.
    Source:
    1 Comisión Nacional de Hidrocarburos (2017). Reporte de Inversión estimada de Contratos de Exploración y Extracción. Investments refer to Capital Cost (CAPEX) associated with Exploration and Extraction activities and assumed commercial success for all areas.

    mmUSD: million dollars
  • Brent and WTI price gap widens

    Brent and WTI price gap widens

    Published on December 18th 2017
    • Price gap between Brent and WTI has widened since October 2016. That month, price difference was almost zero: Brent price was $49.5 per barrel and WTI costed $49.8 per barrel.
    • In December 2017, Brent price has averaged $64.1 per barrel, $6.9 USD higher than WTI price, sold at $57.11 This difference is the highest value observed since March 2015, when it reached 8.1 USD.
    • This increase seems to be related to a greater oil production in unconventional fields in the United States.
    • In October 2017, US oil production in unconventional fields reached 3,200 kbd, 18% higher than production in the same period last year2.
    Fuente:
    1Comisión Nacional de Hidrocarburos (2017). Oil and Gas prices Report. Average prices in December 2017 are calculated with information up to December 13, 2017.
    2EIA (2017). How much shale oil is produced in the United States?. Available at: https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=847&t=6; Only production in Texas and Permian Basin is considered.

    kbd: thousand barrels per day
    USD: dollar
  • Mexico’s oil discovery potential: The biggest in the American continent

    Mexico’s oil discovery potential: The biggest in the American continent

    Published on December 11th 2017
    • Average recoverable reserves (RR) of offshore oil fields discovered in Mexico are 7 times greater than the average recoverable reserves in the US’ fields and 2 times greater than Brazil’s fields.
    • 66% of the offshore oil fields discovered in Mexico have greater Recoverable Reserves than the median field in Brazil, and 88% are bigger than the US median field.
    • Largest recoverable reserves for offshore oil fields discoveries in Mexico includes: Akal (15,499 MMb), Ku (3,231 MMb), Maloob (2,693.71), Abkatún (2,415 MMb) and Zaap (1,856 MMb).
    • The most recent offshore discoveries in Mexico are Zama (680 MMb) and the reserves re-assessment for Amoca (400 MMb).1.
    Notes:
    1Considering a volume of oil in place of 1,700 MMboe for Zama and 1,000 MMboe for Amoca, with a recoverable reserves ratio of 40%. Recoverable reserves are assumed to be oil..

    Wood Mackenzie has identified 237 offshore oil fields for Brazil and 548 for the United States. Mexico has 90 offshore oil fields with reserves as of January 1st, 2017

    MMboe: Million barrels of oil equivalent
    MMb: Million barrels

    Source: For Brazil and USA: Wood Mackenzie Upstream Data Tool. Considering reserves recoverable at discovery time for offshore fields. Reserves recoverable are defined as: The total proven and probable oil, gas, condensate and NGL reserves that are deemed recoverable from the reservoir.
    For Mexico: National Hydrocarbons Commission. See more at "2017 Reserves by field”.
  • 52% of national oil production is heavy crude oil for export

    52% of national oil production is heavy crude oil for export

    Published on November 29th 2017
    • From January to October 2017, oil production reached, on average, 1,966 kb/d (thousand barrels per day). 1,061 kb/d were classified as heavy and extra-heavy oil and 93% of this volume was produced in offshore fields.
    • Production of light and medium crude oil added 904 kb/d. 32% corresponds to onshore and 68% to offshore production.
    • On one hand, practically all heavy oil production (Maya and Altamira crudes) is sent for export. During January to October 2017, 1,024 kb/d were exported.
    • On the other hand, 88% of light crude oil (Olmeca and Isthmus crudes) was sent to national refineries, with an average consumption volume of 798 kb/d.
    Note: The classification by API degrees published in the DOF on 16-2-2015 is used: Super-light (39°<API), Light (31.1<API<=39), Medium (22.3<API<=31.1), Heavy (10<API<=22.3) and Extra-heavy (API<10).
    Types of crude oil for export have the following degrees API: Altamira (15.5° to 16.5° API), Maya (21° to 22° API), Isthmus (32° to 33° API) and Olmeca (38° to 39° API). Available in: http://www.pmi.com.mx/Paginas/Tipoproducto.aspx?IdSec=14
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission. See more at "Oil production by API gravity" & "Oil exports".
  • Istmo de Tehuantepec in Mexico: better alternative to the Panama Canal

    Istmo de Tehuantepec in Mexico: better alternative to the Panama Canal

    Published on November 24th 2017
    • Mexico is an alternative to connect the hydrocarbons produced in the Gulf of Mexico with the Asian markets, through the Istmo de Tehuantepec.
    • Travel time to Chiba port in Japan via the Panama Canal is calculated at 25 days1. Travel time via Istmo de Tehuantepec is estimated at 17 days2. This implies that shipping hydrocarbons to Asia via Istmo de Tehuantepec is 32% faster.
    • Japan imported 3.1 millons of barrels per day in the period January-Octuber 20173. Satisfying this demand via the Panama Canal would result in a bottleneck, since it is estimated that only 50 oil-laden vessels with a capacity of 500,000 barrels each have passed through in the same period. 4 This is equivalent to only 3% of the Japanese demand.
    • Through the existing oil pipeline 5 in the Itsmo de Tehuantepec, up to 351,000 barrels per day could be transported, equivalent to 11% of Japan's demand, with the possibility of constructing new oil pipelines to increase transport capacity.
    Fuente:
    1SeaRates.com Digital Broker & Freight Forwarder. Considering only one way trip. Maritime transit represents a distance of 9,150 nm from Louisiana to Chiba, and 6,589 nm from Salina Cruz to Chiba. Transit time is estimated traveling at 18 knots. Average waiting time in Panama Canal is 2 days.
    2ídem
    3CNH’s estimates with data from the International Energy Agency . Available in: https://www.jodidata.org/oil
    4CNH’s estimates with data from Panama Canal Authority. Available in: https://www.pancanal.com/eng/op/transit-stats
    5PEMEX (2017) Oil pipeline Nuevo Teapa-Salina Cruz 48”. Available in: http://www.pemex.com/nuestro-negocio/logistica/Documents/01%20Capacidades%20Finales%20%20Ductos%20para%20el%20BE.pdf
    nm: Nautical miles
  • Mexico: the best route to export natural gas to Asia

    Methodological note for maritime cost:
    Maritime freight considers a 9,149 nm from Louisiana to Tokyo, and 5,987 nm from Manzanillo to Tokyo. Tanker rental cost is estimated at $130,000 USD/day. Gas consumption is 35 USD/nm and travel speed is 18 knots. Two additional days for loading and unloading are aggregated. A $0.20 USD/mmBTU Panama Canal toll is added in Louisiana route. Average waiting time to cross Panama Canal is 2 days. Tanker rental cost must be calculated for roundtrip.

    Mexico: the best route to export natural gas to Asia

    Published on November 15th 2017
    • Mexico could offer export alternatives for natural gas produced in the Permian Basin. For instance, Manzanillo port has a 500 mmcfd regasification capacity1. This facility could be transformed to liquefy and export Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) to Asia.
    • Travel time from Manzanillo to Japan could be 39% lower than from Louisiana, going from 23 to 14 days.²
    • Maritime travel cost to Japan from Louisiana is estimated at $2.40 USD/mmBTU (including a $0.20 USD/mmBTU Panama Canal toll); traveling from Manzanillo is projected at $1.36 USD/mmBTU.3.³
    • Transportation cost from the Waha Hub (Permian Basin) to Manzanillo is calculated at $0.45 USD/mmBTU4 (estimating a 1,978 km transport pipeline5). On the other hand, pipeline transportation cost from Waha to Henry Hub is estimated at $0.25 USD/mmBTU.6
    • Adding up maritime and pipeline transportation costs, to export natural gas from the Permian Basin to Japan through Manzanillo port would be estimated at $1.81 USD/mmBTU total, 32% lower than exporting from Louisiana, calculated at $2.65 USD/mmBTU.
    Fuente:
    1SENER (2013). Prospectiva de Gas Natural y Gas L.P. 2013-2017, available in: https://www.gob.mx/cms/uploads/attachment/file/62950/Prospectiva_de_Gas_natural_y_Gas_L.P._2013-2027.pdf
    2SeaRates.com Digital Broker & Freight Forwarder
    3CNH’s estimates based on U.S. Natural Gas (LNG) Exports: Opportunities and Challenges (Ripple, 2016). For more information, see Methodological Note
    4CNH’s estimates with pipeline construction costs for Waha-Guadalajara route, considering a 25 year life cycle, 30% of the construction cost for operating costs throughout the project, and a 70% capacity utilization rate. Average Waha-Guadalajara route’s capacity and construction costs were assigned for Guadalajara-Manzanillo pipeline. Data sheets regarding pipeline costs and capacity are available at: http://www.cfe.gob.mx/Licitaciones/Licitaciones/Paginas/PrincipalesProyectos.aspx
    5Distance is the sum of the pipeline’s length in the Waha-Manzanillo route, according to Data Sheets at: http://www.cfe.gob.mx/Licitaciones/Licitaciones/Paginas/PrincipalesProyectos.aspx
    6Pipeline transportation cost from Waha to Henry Hub is the difference between average spot price in Henry Hub minus average spot price in Waha Hub the first week of November 2017. Source: Platts
    mmcfd: Million of cubic feet per day
    USD/mmBTU: Dollar per one million British Terminal Units
    nm: Nautical miles
  • Over half the prospective resources* in Mexico are concentrated in 2 basins

    Over half the prospective resources* in Mexico are concentrated in 2 basins

    Published on November 8th 2017
    • By 2017, Mexico has a volume of 112.8 Bboe of prospective resources. Tampico-Misantla and Deep Gulf of Mexico basins combined represent 58% of these resources.
    • Tampico-Misantla’s prospective resources are estimated at 37.1 Bboe, accounting for 33% of the total resources.
    • As for the Deep Gulf of Mexico, its resources are estimated at 28 Bboe, that represent 25% of the total resources.
    • Southeast Basins, Sabinas-Burro-Picachos and Burgos accumulate 38% of the prospective resources. While the basins of Veracruz, Yucatan Shelf and Chiapas Fold Belt constitute altogether barely 4% of the total.
    Bboe: Billion barrels of oil equivalent.
    *Prospective resource: volume of hydrocarbons in undiscovered accumulations, which is considered to be potentially recoverable according to the available information.
    On the other hand, the term “Reserves” makes reference to the volume of hydrocarbons in discovered accumulations, foreseen to be comercially recovered.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Comission. See more at “Prospective Resources”.
  • Offshore exploration activity and accumulated production 1976-2016

    Offshore exploration activity and accumulated production 1976-2016

    Published on October 31st 2017
    • From 1976 to 2016, Mexico drilled 316 offshore exploration wells in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), while Brazil drilled 2,420 and the United States 6,076 in the GOM.
    • With just 5% and 13% of US and Brazil’s offshore exploration wells respectively, Mexico produced 1.6 times more hydrocarbons than the US and 2.8 times more than Brazil.
    Sources:
    1\ Wood Mackenzie Upstream Data Tool: Considers exploration wells completed from 1976 to 2016. For Mexico and the US, only Gulf of Mexico exploration wells are considered.
    2\ Accumulated production: Brazil and the US information comes from Wood Mackenzie Upstream Data Tool, considering exploration wells completed from 1976 to 2016.
    Information for Mexico is available at: Statistics
    MMBOE: Million barrels of oil equivalent
  • Oil production drops 10%

    Oil production drops 10%

    Published on October 19th 2017
    • In September 2017, national oil production stood at 1,732 Mbd (thousands of barrels per day), while in the previous month it reached 1,932.1 Mbd, representing a decrease of 10%.
    • The early maintenance work carried out by Pemex during the first days of September in the Ku-Maloob-Zaap* asset after Hurricane Harvey, led to a 16% decrease in the production of that asset. This affected notably the national indicator since so far in 2017, more than 4 out of every 10 barrels were produced by Ku-Maloob-Zaap.
    Note: The Ku-Maloob-Zaap Asset consists of the Ku, Maloob, Zaap, Bacab, Lum and Ayatsil fields.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission. See more at “Tablero de producción de Petróleo y Gas”
  • Farmouts represent 23% of Pemex’s capital expenditures in 2017

    Farmouts represent 23% of Pemex’s capital expenditures in 2017

    Published on October 12th 2017
    • As a result of the farmouts tenders, Pemex collected $2,513.52 million dollars (mmusd) in committed investment from it's partners, coming from the three blocks awarded: Trion, on December 5th, 2016, Cárdenas-Mora and Ogarrio, on October 4th of this year.
    • The $ 2,513.52 mmusd consists of: $ 1,974 mmusd for the joint investment account in Trion, $ 166.5 mmusd in Cárdenas-Mora and $ 373.02 mmusd for Ogarrio. While the State will receive $ 93.25 mmusd.
    • These contributions represent 23.3% of the estimated capital expenditures held and to execute by Pemex in 2017\¹.
    Note: The distribution of the bonds was done as follows:
    • Trion: Pemex (90%) and State (10%)
    • Cárdenas-Mora: Pemex (First 69 mmusd + 80% from remaining part) and State (20% from remaining part).
    • Ogarrio: Pemex (First 59.6 mmusd + 80% from remaining part) and State (20% from remaining part)
    Source: ¹\Pemex http://www.pemex.com/ri/finanzas/Paginas/InversionCifras.aspx and National Hydrocarbons Comission. See more at "TRION bidding results", "CARDENAS-MORA bidding results", "OGARRIO bidding results"
  • Gas Flaring and Venting reduced by 73%

    Gas Flaring and Venting reduced by 73%

    Published on October 3rd 2017
    • In August 2017, Pemex flared and vented 128.2 million cubic feet per day (MMCFPD) of natural gas; this cut is also equivalent to a reduction of 352.4 MMCFPD in relation to August 2016. In perspective, the latter figure represents 9% of what was domestically produced in August 2017.
    • Most of the reduction was achieved in the Ku-Maloop-Zaap asset with a participation of 173.1 MMCFPD, followed by the Abkatún-Pol-Chuc asset with a decline of 103.7 MMCFPD; these are equivalent to a reduction of 85% and 95%, respectively.
    • This enhancement in gas usage takes place after the publication, in January 2016, of the Natural Gas Usage Technical Provisions by CNH as well as the corrective programs that have been implemented given these Provisions.
    National Hydrocarbons Commission. See more at “Natural gas flaring and venting follow-up”
  • 57% of the investment has Mexican participation

    57% of the investment has Mexican participation

    Published on September 22nd 2017
    • In the 7 bids of rounds 1 and 2, Mexican companies reach an approved investment and committed investment of $689 million dollars, Mexican companies associated with foreign companies $667 mmusd and foreign companies $1,030 mmusd.
    • For onshore blocks an investment of $827 mmusd is reached, of which 83% corresponds to Mexican companies. For shallow water blocks, an investment of $ 1,072 mmusd and 47% of this amount corresponds to Mexican companies in association with foreign companies.
    • For deepwater blocks, Pemex and Sierra have allotted blocks in association with foreign companies, representing 14% of the investment committed in R1.4.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, see more at “Investment in Contracts", “Round 1.4 Results”, “Round 2.1 Results”, “Round 2.2 Results” y “Round 2.3 Results”.
  • Contractors to drill 104 wells

    Contractors to drill 104 wells

    Published on September 12th 2017
    • The 4 tenders from round one and three for round two have triggered the drilling of 104 wells. Of these, 66 are exploratory and 38 are for development.
    • Of the plans approved for tender one, two and three of round one, the drilling of 51 wells, 13 for offshore exploration and 38 for onshore development, were acknowledged.
    • For tenders R1.4, R2.1, R2.2 and R2.3, there is an investment commitment equivalent to the drilling of 53 exploratory wells *; of which 26 will be drilled onshore and 17 offshore.
    • The 66 exploratory exploration wells are equivalent to Pemex's exploratory drilling of the last 3 years (2014-2016)
    * Estimated based on additional investment bids from winning bidders.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, see more at “Investment in Contracts", “Round 1.4 Results”, “Round 2.1 Results”, “Round 2.2 Results” y “Round 2.3 Results”.
  • More than $ 2,385 million of approved and committed investment in 7 tenders

    More than $ 2,385 million of approved and committed investment in 7 tenders

    Published on September 6th 2017
    • Investments for $ 1,142 million (mmusd) have been approved for the blocks awarded of the first three tenders of round one.
    • For tenders 1.4, 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3, there is an investment commitment * of at least $ 1,245 mmusd. In the coming months the CNH will approve the investments plans from these tenders.
    • The investments related to the initial stage of these projects reach $ 2,387 million dollars. In case of commercial success, the total investments could exceed $ 50 thousand mmusd **.
    * Estimated based on the Minimum Work Program and the additional investment offers of the winning bidders.
    ** If Trion is considered, the investments would reach more than $ 60 thousand mmusd.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, see more at “Investment in Contracts", “Round 1.4 Results”, “Round 2.1 Results”, “Round 2.2 Results” y “Round 2.3 Results”.
  • Import of natural gas exceeds national production

    Import of natural gas exceeds national production

    Published on August 30th 2017
    • In June 2017, dry natural gas production stood at 3,164 million cubic feet per day (MMcfd), while imports totaled 5,027 MMcdf, an increase of 3.6% over the previous month.
    • Since 2016, the volume of imported natural gas is higher than domestic production.
    • The differential between imports and production went from 709 MMcfd in 2016 to 1,863 MMcfd in June 2017. In other words, the gap between imports and production increased by 162%.
    Source: Petróleos Mexicanos and Secretaría de Energía, see more at “Natural Gas Balance”
  • Ku-Maloob-Zaap achieves more than 50% reduction in natural gas flaring and venting

    Ku-Maloob-Zaap achieves more than 50% reduction in natural gas flaring and venting

    Published on August 22nd 2017
    • The asset Ku-Maloob-Zaap, is composed of the fields: Ayatsil, Bacab, Ku, Lum, Maloob and Zaap. In June 2017, 44% of the national oil production came from this asset.
    • On November 15, 2016, the National Hydrocarbons Comission sanctioned PEMEX for non-compliance with the gas utilization targets for this asset. As a result, PEMEX presented a program of corrective actions amounting 3,028 million dollars for the period 2016-2019.
    • As a result of corrective actions, in the first half of 2017 a reduction in natural gas flaring and venting of 55% was achieved, going from 197 million cubic feet per day (MMcfd) in January to 88.3 MMcfd in June
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, for more information, go to “Gas flaring and venting”
  • Five fields produce 53% of national oil

    Five fields produce 53% of national oil

    Published on August 16th 2017
    • In June 2017, the five fields with the largest oil production in the country, according to their contribution, were: Maloob, Zaap, Xanab, Ku and Xux. Together, they produced 1,063.3 thousand barrels per day (KBPD), of a national total of 2,009.6 KBPD.
    • The Xanab and Xux fields, began production in 2009 and 2014, respectively. For the first half of 2017, they reached an average production per well of 13.8 KBPD and 5.1 KBPD, respectively.
    • While the Maloob, Zaap and Ku fields saw their first barrel in 1985, 1992 and 1981, respectively. In the first half of 2017, they achieved an average production per well of 5.1 KBPD, 5.5 KBPD and 3.2 KBPD respectively.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, for more information, go to “National oil and gas production”
  • Non-associated natural gas basins at the lowest level of the last 15 years

    Non-associated natural gas basins at the lowest level of the last 15 years

    Published on August 7th 2017
    • In the first half of 2017, production of the main non-associated natural gas basins* fell 57% from the level reached 10 years ago and is at its lowest point in the last 15 years.
    • The drilling of wells in these basins has been in decline since 2006, which has directly impacted the production level. So far in 2017, no new wells have been drilled.
    • The fall in the production of non-associated gas is related to the collapse of the price of this hydrocarbon, which lost 55% of its value in 10 years.
    * Basins: Cuenca de Burgos, Plataforma Burro-Picachos, Sabinas and Veracruz.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, see more details at “Report of drilling rigs and wells”, “Oil and gas prices”, “National oil and gas production”.
  • Drilling rigs in offshore exploration raises

    Drilling rigs in offshore exploration raises

    Published on July 31st 2017
    • In June 2017 there were 15.5 drilling rigs in offshore exploration, the largest number of the last 10 years.
    • About one in two drilling rigs engaged in offshore exploration were operated by new contractors.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, for more information, please refer to “Report of drilling rigs and wells”.
  • Mexico imports 81% of natural gas consumption

    Mexico imports 81% of natural gas consumption

    Published on July 20th 2017
    • On April, 2017, last available data, Mexico imported 81% of the domestic consumption*.
    • Domestic consumption* amounted to 5,810 million standard cubic feet per day (mmscfd), and imports recorded 4,683 mmscfd.
    • At the beginning of 2015, imports accounted for 59% of natural gas consumption. In 2017 this percentage has soared above 80%.
    *Domestic consumption is considered as the supply of natural gas after the consumption of Pemex. Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, for more information go to “Balance de Gas Natural”
  • Gulf of Mexico’s discoveries by private companies

    Gulf of Mexico’s discoveries by private companies

    Published on July 13th 2017
    • Talos Energy LLC discovered light oil by drilling the Zama-1 well. This is one of the biggest oil field discoveries since 2000.
    • According to the latest calculations by the Company, estimated resources could range between 1,400 to 2,000 million barrels of equivalent oil.
    • Eni announces an increase in the estimate of resources in place at Amoca to 1,000 million barrels of equivalent oil.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission with information of WoodMackenzie, "Talos Energy LLC" and "ENI", or more information go to CNH´s "Press Bulletin 021"
  • Prequalified bidders for Round 2.2 and 2.3

    Prequalified bidders for Round 2.2 and 2.3

    Published on July 6th 2017
    • The second and third hydrocarbons bidding Rounds of Mexico´s Round 2, will take place on July 12, 2017.
    • There are 11 prequalified companies for Round 2.2 and 28 for Round 2.3.
    • 65%, 6 of the prequalified bidders for Round 2.2 are Mexican companies.
    • 75%, 21 of the prequalified bidders for Round 2.3 are Mexican companies.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission. For more information go to: “Oil companies in Mexico".
    CNH invites you to keep up with the live streaming of the second and third hydrocarbons’ bidding Rounds of Mexico´s Round 2, it will take place on July 12 and you can watch it on the following link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCB5ZTtQx6tzV4zBdaNY-qhA
  • Round 2.1 results

    Round 2.1 results

    Published on June 22nd 2017
    • 10 auctioned areas were adjudicated to 12 companies in Round 2.1.
    • This is the first time that companies from Germany, Spain and Russia won an area in Mexico´s bidding rounds.
    • PEMEX won two areas, both of them as a consortia, one of them with DEA Deutsche Erdoel and the other with Ecopetrol.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission. More details in “Round 2.1 results"
  • National Oil Production

    National Oil Production

    Published on June 14th 2017
    • Oil production in Mexico was 2,013 thousand barrels per day in April 2017.
    • The main oil producers fields in Mexico are Maloob, Zaap, Xanab, Ku and Xux. Those fields reached an aggregated production of 1,056 thousand barrels per day, in average during April.
    • The fields with the main oil production are located in shallow water of the Gulf of Mexico.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission. More details in the “Oil and Gas Production Dashboard“.
    Kbd: Thousand barrels per day.
  • 2017 Hydrocarbons Reserves

    2017 Hydrocarbons Reserves

    Published on June 7th 2017
    • 3P reserves in México were 25,858 MMBOE as of January 1st, 2017
    • The discovery of five fields: Doctus, Nobilis, Pokche, Teca and Uchbal, added 684 MMBOE.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission. More details in the “2017 Reserves by field“ report, xlsx and pdf and http://www.gob.mx/cnh/documentos/presentaciones-sobre-reservas.
    Note: Reserves as of January 1st, 2016 and 2017.
    Others: Includes Development, Delimitation and Revisions
    MMBOE: Million Barrels of Oil Equivalent.
  • Round 2.1 participants

    Round 2.1 participants

    Published on June 2nd 2017
    • 25 bidders prequalified for Round 2.1 bidding process, 20 individually and 5 in consortia.
    • Among prequalified bidders 26 companies are participating.
    • The prequalified companies are from 15 different countries, including 4 from Mexico.
    Source: Comisión Nacional de Hidrocarburos, for more information go to “Oil companies in Mexico” report and http://rondasmexico.gob.mx.
    ¹Companies that participate individually or as part of a consortia.
  • Hydrocarbon’s Exploration & Production payments to the State

    Hydrocarbon’s Exploration & Production payments to the State

    Published on May 25th 2017
    • Between January and February 2017, the Mexican Oil Fund received 4,080 million dollars (mmUSD) as a result of hydrocarbon E&P activities.
    • Payments reached 26,819 mmUSD in 2015, while in 2016 were 16,891 mmUSD.
    • The main portion is the “Derecho de Utilidad Compartida”, with 86.76% of total payments in 2017*.
    Source: Mexican Oil Fund (http://www.fmped.org.mx/estadisticas/). For more information go to “Hydrocarbon Payments".
    *Includes January and February 2017.
    **Otros: Other payments such as Derecho de Exploración, Cuota Contractual, Regalía Base and Regalía Adicional.
  • Round 1 Contracts Approved Investments

    Round 1 Contracts Approved Investments

    Published on May 17th, 2017
    • The Round 1 Contract Areas have an approved investment of 1.076 billion dollars for the period 2015-2020.
    • 71% of total investments are programmed to be spent during 2017.
    • 57% of Round 1 total approved investment corresponds to the Second bidding process Appraisal Plans execution.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission, with Contractors information. More details in “Contracts Investment” report.
    Figures in millions of dollars
  • Drilling Rigs in Mexico

    Drilling Rigs in Mexico

    Published on May 10th, 2017
    • During March 2017, 25 drilling rigs operated in Mexico, 17 in exploratory activities and 8 in development.
    • 3 of the rigs worked within the contractual areas.
    • The number of active rigs has shown a decrease of 87%, between 2009 and 2017*.
    • Development drilling rigs have shown the main decrease, going from 150 on average during 2009 to 19 in 2016.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission. More details in the "Drilling Rigs ".
    Data includes drilling rigs in entitlements and contractual areas.
    This report was modified due to updated data on June 2017.
    * Average from January to March.
  • National oil production increased in March 2017

    National oil production increased in March 2017

    Published on May 04, 2017
    • The national oil production grew 0.1% in March 2017 compared to the previous month.
    • The volume of oil produced reached 2,019 thousand barrels per day, breaking its downward trend for the first time since March 2016.
    • The fields with the main increases were Xanab, Maloob, Xux, Ayatsil and Zaap.
    • The rest of the fields decreased their production by 21.1 thousand barrels per day.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission. More details in the "National oil and gas production" and "Oil production by field" reports.
  • Completion of the exploratory well Koban-1: commercial producer gas and condensate

    Completion of the exploratory well Koban-1: commercial producer gas and condensate

    Published on April 26, 2017
    • On March 31st, 2017 PEMEX completed the exploratory well Koban-1. Resulting on a commercial producer of gas and condensate.
    • The well is 12 meters under the sea level and has a vertical drilling depth of 6,425 meters.
    • The productive interval of 67 meters has a top of 6,164 vmbrt and a base of 6,231 vmbrt, with a pressure of 611 kg/cm2.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission. More details in the report "Exploratory Activity".
    vmbrt: vertical meters below rotary table.
  • Proved Reserves 2017

    Proved reserves 2017

    Published on April 19, 2017
    • Proved reserves (1P) at January 1st , 2017 are 9,161 Mboe.
    • This figure represents a 10.6% decrease with respect to 2016 1P reserves (10,243 Mboe).
    • The 77% of the 1P reserves corresponds to oil reserves (7,037 Mb).
    • The “Marina Noreste” region contains the 53% of the total 1P reserves.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission. More details in the report “2017 Reserves by field".
    Mboe: million barrels of oil equivalent / Mb: million barrels.
  • Completion of the exploratory well Teekit-1001: commercial producer of heavy oil.

    Completion of the exploratory well Teekit-1001: commercial producer of heavy oil.

    Published on April 12, 2017
    • On February 12th 2017 the exploratory well Teekit-1001 was completed, resulting on a commercial producer of 22.4 °API oil.
    • Production trials turned out in a peak of 3,083 vmbrt and a base of 3,116 vmbrt, with a pressure of 328.9 kg/cm2.
    • The well is 30 meters under the sea level and has a drilling depth of 3,613 meters.
    Source: National Hydrocarbons Commission. More details in the "Exploratory Activity".
    vmbrt: vertical meters below rotary table.
  • Natural Gas Imports

    Natural Gas Imports

    Published on April 04, 2017
    • At 2015, Natural Gas Imports represented 67% of the National Demand, without considering Oil & Gas Industry demand.
    • Natural Gas Imports reached 4,200 million of cubic feet per day in 2016.
    • Natural Gas Imports increased 188% since 2010.
    National Demand without Oil & Gas Industry 2016 data corresponds to SENER "2016-2030 Natural Gas Prospective estimation".
    Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA) and Sistema de Información Arancelaria Vía Internet (SIAVI). More info at “Natural Gas Market".

HYDROCARBONS INFORMATION SYSTEM

Visit the Hydrocarbons Information System where you can view and download the historical production of oil and gas by well, including other statistical data of interest for the Mexican oil sector of the National Hydrocarbons Commission.

INTERACTIVE DASHBOARDS

OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION

HYDROCARBON RESERVES

OIL COMPANIES IN MEXICO

STATISTICAL REPORTS

This section provides timely monitoring of the sectorial performance through reports related to the hydrocarbons exploration and extraction.

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OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION

Report Excel PDF Geographical Information
National oil and gas production OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Contracts production OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Oil Export and Refining OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Oil and gas production by state OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Natural Gas Balance Natural Gas Balance Excel Natural Gas Balance Excel

MAIN OIL AND GAS PROJECTS

Shale oil and gas exploration and production OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Akal reports OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Ku, Maloob y Zaap report OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Aceite Terciario del Golfo OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF

GAS FLARING AND VENTING FOLLOW UP

Gas flaring and venting OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF

PETROLEUM EXPLORATION

Report Excel PDF Geographical Information
ARES report OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Exploratory activity OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF

RESOURSES AND RESERVES

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Prospective Resources OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
2018 Reserves by entitlement OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel
2018 Reserves by field OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
2017 Reserves by entitlement OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel
2016 Reserves by entitlement OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel
2012 - 2017 Reserves by field OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel
Reserves and production Reserves and production Excel Reserves and production PDF

PETROLEUM ACTIVITY INDICATORS

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Drilling equipment and wells report OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Wells producing oil, associated gas and non-associated gas by field OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel

BIDDINGS AND CONTRACTS

Report Excel PDF Geographical Information
Contracts summary OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Round 1 results OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Round 2 results OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Round 3.1 results OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Farmouts results OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Round 3.2 summary OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Round 3.3 summary OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Oil companies in Mexico OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Investments by Round and Bid OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF

ECONOMIC INDICATORS

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Oil and gas prices OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION Excel OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION PDF
Hydrocarbon Payments Hydrocarbon Payments Excel Hydrocarbon Payments PDF